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Can arthritis in your thighs make your movements slow?

Hip arthritis commonly describes the most common for of hip arthritis, which is known medically as hip osteoarthritis.

Hip osteoarthritis is a joint disease that mostly affects your hip joint cartilage. Articular cartilage is the hard slippery surface that covers the sections of bones that move against each other in your hip joint.

Healthy articular cartilage allows your hip joint bones to smoothly and painlessly glide over each other and also helps to absorb any shock forces not dispersed by your hip muscles.

In hip osteoarthritis, your top layer of articular cartilage breaks down and wears away. Eventually, your cortical bone that lies under the cartilage rubs together to cause pain, swelling, grating and loss of hip joint motion.

Muscle weakness and the resultant hip joint instability associated is thought to contribute towards the deterioration of your hip joint cartilage. Weaker hip muscles also provide less shock absorption capabilities than their strong counterparts, which increases your hip joint compression forces.

Hip osteoarthritis usually happens gradually over time.

Some risk factors that might increase your likelihood of deterioration include:

Being overweight.
Age.
Previous joint injury.
Muscle weakness.
Stresses on the joints from certain jobs and playing sports.
Poor biomechanics.
Malformed joints or a genetic defect in your joint cartilage.