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herbs and spices for diabetes

Bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillum) is the European form of blueberries. Bilberries are superior to blueberries because they are blue throughout, whereas our form is blue only on the outside. And the blue color carries anthocyanins—the wholesome antioxidants that fight diabetes, strengthen your heart, and lower inflammation and blood fats.

A study conducted at the Institute of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition found that regular consumption of fresh bilberries (400 grams daily) reduced inflammation markers and improved glucose tolerance in people with features of metabolic syndrome. When compared with the control group (who maintained their habitual diets), researchers found that the levels of inflammation marker interleukin-6 were 20 percent lower in those who increased their consumption of bilberries.

Chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla) lowers blood sugar and prevents diabetic complications by taking the sugar out of your blood and putting it into storage in your liver. And after a day of hard work, there is hardly anything more calming and soothing than a cup of chamomile tea!

Cumin (Cuminum cyminum) is a spice in the parsley family that goes well with red lentils or brown rice. Use it generously, as cumin lowers blood sugar and cholesterol. Cumin also has a good effect on the advanced glycation end products (AGEs) that are so damaging in diabetes.

Dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) is a wonderful all-around herb, so you should never try to eradicate this “weed” from your garden. A dark, leafy green, it restocks your body with necessary bitter agents, lowers your blood pressure, and heals your liver. Like nettles, dandelions increase urinary flow and, thereby, support a mild cleansing action. And dandelion is said to help with weight loss, which is paramount for most people with diabetes.