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reduce fever babies

Cold Compresses

As soon as your baby develops a fever, the first thing to do is put a cool, wet washcloth on your baby’s forehead. As the water from the wet washcloth evaporates from the skin, it will draw the fever out and the temperature will come down quickly.

Put some cool tap water in a bowl.
Soak a clean washcloth in the water.
Wring out the excessive water, then place the wet cloth on the baby’s forehead.
Once the cloth warms, remove it and repeat again.
Do this until the fever has gone.
You can also use the damp washcloth to sponge areas like your baby’s armpits, feet, hands and groin to reduce the temperature.

Lukewarm Bath

A lukewarm bath will help relax a fussy baby and help regulate the body temperature. It will even help your baby sleep better, which is needed for faster recovery.

For babies younger than 6 months, give a lukewarm sponge bath 2 or 3 times a day.
For babies 6 months or older, give them a regular bath in lukewarm water a few times a day.
After each bath, dress your baby immediately.

Breast Milk

For babies younger than 6 months old who have a fever, breast milk is very important. It offers a unique balance of nutrients that strengthens a baby’s weak immune system and is tailored to fight a baby’s illness.

Breast milk is quickly and easily digested. It will even keep a sick baby properly hydrated, which is essential for faster recovery.

Try to breastfeed your young baby frequently. If your baby refuses to nurse while experiencing a fever, try different nursing positions. You can keep the baby upright while breastfeeding to make your baby more comfortable during feeding sessions.
If your baby regularly refuses nursing, pump out the breast milk and feed it to your baby using a spoon or bottle.

Give More Fluids

For sick babies, it is important to increase fluid intake. Fluid will help cool them down and replace the fluid lost through sweating to prevent dehydration.

Dehydration may lead to various other complications and delay recovery.

Due to having a fever, babies may refuse large amounts of fluid at a time. So, try to give them smaller amounts more often.

Give oral rehydration solutions (either homemade or readily available in the market) along with lukewarm water to small babies younger than 6 months old to help replenish fluids and electrolytes.
Along with water and oral rehydration solutions, cold milk, ice pops, fruit juice and chilled yogurt can be given to babies 6 months or older.