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natural antibiotics

Honey is one the oldest known antibiotics, tracing back to ancient times. Egyptians frequently used honey as a natural antibiotic and a skin protectant.

Honey contains hydrogen peroxide, which may account for some of its antibacterial properties. It also has a high sugar content, which can help stop the growth of certain bacteria.

Additionally, honey has a low pH level. This works to pull moisture away from bacteria, causing the bacteria to get dehydrated and die off.

To use honey as an antibiotic, apply it directly to the wound or infected area. The honey can help kill off the bacteria and aid in the healing process. If possible, opt for raw Manuka honey, as this form of honey offers the most health benefits.

Garlic has long been thought to have antimicrobial properties. One 2011 study found that garlic concentrate is effective against bacteria. You can purchase garlic concentrate or extract at your local health food store. You may also be able to make your own by soaking a few garlic cloves in olive oil.

Garlic is generally safe to ingest, although large doses might cause internal bleeding. Up to two cloves per day is considered an acceptable dosage. If you’re taking a garlic supplement, be sure to follow the dosage directions as provided.

Myrrh extract
myrrh
Although many people are familiar with myrrh, its ability to ward off harmful germs isn’t as widely known.

Researchers in a 2000 study concluded that an extract of myrrh could kill off several everyday pathogens. This includes:

E. coli
Staphylococcus aureus
Pseudomonas aeruginosa
Candida albicans
Although it’s generally well-tolerated, ingesting myrrh may cause diarrhea. If applying myrrh to the skin, it’s possible to experience a small skin rash. If consumed in large doses, myrrh may cause heart problems. Myrrh is typically pre-packaged for use, so be sure to follow the dosage instructions as labeled.

hyme essential oil
thyme
Many all-natural household cleaners use thyme essential oil. This oil has been shown to be especially helpful against antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

In a 2011 study, researchers tested the effectiveness of both lavender and thyme essential oil. Both oils were testing in a pool of over 120 strains of bacteria. The researchers found thyme essential oil to be more effective at killing bacteria than lavender essential oil.

This treatment is for external use only. You shouldn’t take thyme oil by mouth. Before applying to the affected area, be sure to dilute the essential oil with equal parts carrier oil. Common carrier oils include coconut and olive oils.

Applying undiluted essential oil to the skin may cause inflammation and irritation.

People with high blood pressure or hyperthyroid problems shouldn’t use thyme essential oil.